Nutrition Consultations
Dr. Thunes will assess your current concerns and create a complete feeding program for your individual horse or entire barn
Veterinary Consulting
Dr. Thunes is also available for collaboration both in person and via video conferencing with veterinary practices seeking nutritional support for their patients.
Corporate Consulting
With extensive experience as a consulting nutritionist to international feed and supplement companies, Dr. Thunes is a valuable asset in any phase of development
Educational Engagements
Dr. Clair Thunes is a dynamic speaker and educator dedicated to empowering horse owners with the knowledge to make sound decisions when it comes to feeding their herd

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The nights are drawing in which means it's time to get ready for winter ❄️ while the weather ☀️is still on your side. Over the next few days we will post some check lists to help get you started. Here's a few ideas for your feed room. 🧹🐁🐴
What would you add? Share in the comments below.
... See MoreSee Less

The nights are drawing in which means its time to get ready for winter ❄️ while the weather ☀️is still on your side. Over the next few days we will post some check lists to help get you started. Heres a few ideas for your feed room. 🧹🐁🐴
What would you add?  Share in the comments below.

When was the last time you objectively assessed your horses 🐴 weight and condition?

Now is a great time to take a good look at your horse in preparation for winter. If your horse is underweight it is ideal to take action for weight gain now before the weather gets colder and it is harder to put on condition. Conversely if your horse is overweight you can plan for how to use the winter to your advantage to help with weight loss.

Ideally horses will score right around a 5 on the Hennecke condition scoring scale. Condition scoring is a great skill to develop. Take a look at each area of your horse from the chart below and read the description of a 5. Put your hands on your horse and take a good look. Do you agree that this score describes what you see or feel? If not move up or down accordingly. Repeat this process for all 6 areas on the chart and then average the 6 scores for your overall body condition score.

Have a go and share a confirmation picture of your 🐎 horse in the comments with the scores you awarded and we will let you now our thoughts.
... See MoreSee Less

When was the last time you objectively assessed your horses 🐴 weight and condition? 

Now is a great time to take a good look at your horse in preparation for winter. If your horse is underweight it is ideal to take action for weight gain now before the weather gets colder and it is harder to put on condition. Conversely if your horse is overweight you can plan for how to use the winter to your advantage to help with weight loss. 

Ideally horses will score right around a 5 on the Hennecke condition scoring scale. Condition scoring is a great skill to develop. Take a look at each area of your horse from the chart below and read the description of a 5. Put your hands on your horse and take a good look. Do you agree that this score describes what you see or feel? If not move up or down accordingly. Repeat this process for all 6 areas on the chart and then average the 6 scores for your overall body condition score.

Have a go and share a confirmation picture of your 🐎 horse in the comments with the scores you awarded and we will let you now our thoughts.Image attachment

Comment on Facebook

I'm trying not to, the boys are all a bit too........ round 🙈 We are going into winter, though, so hoping some cold weather will do them good. I've been considering a 1" hole haynet for the "warmer" months, and using the 1.5" hole net for when it gets close to -20°c and colder. My long yearling colt. He's not as bad as his buddy, but he does have a slight crease around his tail head 😶. He also has a hay belly.... Easy keeping Newfoundland Pony.

My “objective” assessment is a 5 - 5.25. I look forward to your thoughts!

Emma the Queen's Fell Pony stands and waits to pay tribute to her Monarch as the Queen's coffin is brought to Windsor Castle. ... See MoreSee Less

Emma the Queens Fell Pony stands and waits to pay tribute to her Monarch as the Queens coffin is brought to Windsor Castle.

Comment on Facebook

Love this❤️

Did you know that the vast majority of laminitis cases have a hormonal/endocrine root. In some studies the number has been as high as 89% of cases!

There is a peak of laminitis in the spring (May being the most prevalent month in some studies). These cases are related to horses with insulin dysregulation grazing young high sugar growths of grass. A second peak of cases occurs in the fall which may or may not be related to a fall flush of grass.

There is a natural rise in the hormone ACTH from late summer through end November in all horses. ACTH stimulates release of cortisol. Cortisol is commonly known as the stress hormone. The cortisol released acts to decrease sensitivity to insulin which can cause an increase in circulating insulin in your horse’s blood, and this is closely linked to laminitis risk.

A horse with an insulin value of over 40 uIU/dL has a 70% risk of developing laminitis. The more insulin, the higher the risk of laminitis. A horse that already has elevated ACTH levels due to Pituitary Pars Intermedia Dysfunction (PPID or Cushing’s Disease) will have especially high ACTH levels unless the PPID is being well controlled.

Sadly, we annually have owners reaching out to us for diet help because their senior horse has developed Fall laminitis that resulted from previously undiagnosed and therefore uncontrolled PPID.

If you have a senior horse/pony, it can be smart to test ACTH levels in September to ensure that their ACTH is seasonally normal. Similarly if your horse/pony is already diagnosed with PPID, testing now will help determine whether medication doses need to be adjusted. If you have a horse/pony with elevated insulin levels be very cautious grazing them on Fall pastures.

If you think your horse might have symptoms of cushings, shows signs of equine metabolic syndrome or you have any concerns about laminitis you should talk to your veterinarian.
... See MoreSee Less

Did you know that the vast majority of laminitis cases have a hormonal/endocrine root. In some studies the number has been as high as 89% of cases! 

There is a peak of laminitis in the spring (May being the most prevalent month in some studies). These cases are related to horses with insulin dysregulation grazing young high sugar growths of grass. A second peak of cases occurs in the fall which may or may not be related to a fall flush of grass. 

There is a natural rise in the hormone ACTH from late summer through end November in all horses. ACTH stimulates release of cortisol. Cortisol is commonly known as the stress hormone. The cortisol released acts to decrease sensitivity to insulin which can cause an increase in circulating insulin in your horse’s blood, and this is closely linked to laminitis risk. 

A horse with an insulin value of over 40 uIU/dL has a 70% risk of developing laminitis.  The more insulin, the higher the risk of laminitis. A horse that already has elevated ACTH levels due to Pituitary Pars Intermedia Dysfunction (PPID or Cushing’s Disease) will have especially high ACTH levels unless the PPID is being well controlled. 

Sadly, we annually have owners reaching out to us for diet help because their senior horse has developed Fall laminitis that resulted from previously undiagnosed and therefore uncontrolled PPID.

If you have a senior horse/pony, it can be smart to test ACTH levels in September to ensure that their ACTH is seasonally normal. Similarly if your horse/pony is already diagnosed with PPID, testing now will help determine whether medication doses need to be adjusted. If you have a horse/pony with elevated insulin levels be very cautious grazing them on Fall pastures.

If you think your horse might have symptoms of cushings, shows signs of equine metabolic syndrome or you have any concerns about laminitis you should talk to your veterinarian.

In a study of 93 veterinary-diagnosed laminitis cases, 42 of the cases were not recognized as laminitis by the owner. Instead these cases were misidentified as undefined lamenesses, foot abscesses, colic and stiffness. Researchers concluded that owner education in order to better identify early symptoms of laminitis is needed.

How confident do you feel that you could identify laminitis in your horse?
... See MoreSee Less

In a study of 93 veterinary-diagnosed laminitis cases, 42 of the cases were not recognized as laminitis by the owner. Instead these cases were misidentified as undefined lamenesses, foot abscesses, colic and stiffness. Researchers concluded that owner education in order to better identify early symptoms of laminitis is needed. 

How confident do you feel that you could identify laminitis in your horse?

Comment on Facebook

We owe it to them to educate ourselves because prevention is needed most of all.

Lamanitis sneaks its ugly self in and just wrecks thngs....

The Queen was a greater lover of and advocate for horses. From a young age I was mesmerized by her riding side saddle on Burmese the horse she was gifted by Canada. The Trooping of the colour was an amazing spectacle. She had such poise and confidence riding through the huge crowds. I grew up looking up to her and it is so touching to see how many people are saddened by her passing. Hopefully her days are now filled with Highland ponies, race horses and Burmese. - Dr. Clair ... See MoreSee Less

The Queen was a greater lover of and advocate for horses. From a young age I was mesmerized by her riding side saddle on Burmese the horse she was gifted by Canada. The Trooping of the colour was an amazing spectacle. She had such poise and confidence riding through the huge crowds. I grew up looking up to her and it is so touching to see how many people are saddened by her passing. Hopefully her days are now filled with Highland ponies, race horses and Burmese. - Dr. ClairImage attachment

Comment on Facebook

The Queen riding Burmese.

In the first photo the Queen is riding her Fell pony mare Carltonlima Emma. She was instrumental in saving this native breed from extinction.

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